Category Archives: State-owned firms

Irish Water’s 2015 annual report

Irish Water’s 2015 annual report is out. There’s lots of interesting bits in there. Irish Water’s total liabilities grew from €890m in 2014 to €1.44bn in 2015. Irish Water borrowed lots: Net debt grew from €324m to €890m. Borrowings: The number of people paying bills in the 4th cycle cratered. Here’s a graph: Here’s the… Read More »

Is this IBRC's Statement of Affairs?

This comes from an anonymous Twitter account – @QuinnAnglo – so all the usual provisos apply. The tweeter in question claims this document to be the Statement of Affairs of IBRC before the liquidation of the company in February 2013. It includes a list of creditors (though not depositors – as Noonan intervened on that… Read More »

The IBRC plan 2011-2020

Last year we wrote about an unredacted document we obtained that showed IBRC’s winddown plans up to 2020. Now that IBRC is in liquidation we are publishing the document in full, and much of it is still relevant in terms of the loanbook: Unredacted (1) (PDF) Unredacted (1) (Text)

Anglo Irish/INBS restructuring plan 2011-2020

TheStory.ie has obtained a confidential plan submitted by Anglo Irish Bank/Irish Nationwide to the European Commission, which was put together by a working group from the Department of Finance, the NTMA, the Central Bank, Anglo and INBS. The plan, dated January 31, 2011 was submitted to the European Commission for approval and was guided by… Read More »

NAMA and the Master SPV

NAMA is rather complicated. And so is its ownership structure. One would think NAMA would publish their company documents on their website – but they don’t. It is afterall an interminably opaque organisation. To remedy at least a part of this, I am publishing the company accounts of all NAMA related companies – firstly and… Read More »

Anglo companies

Since we now own them – I will be buying and publishing the accounts for all Anglo Irish Bank subsidiaries. Many of them have or had Minister Brian Lenihan as a director. First up is Anglo Irish Asset Finance, 2008 and 2009 accounts. The 2009 accounts contain the now infamous yen loss, Colm McCarthy referred… Read More »